Instead of interviewing up-and-coming comedians we love on Twitter, we’re going live on Instagram every week to check in with some of our favorite people in comedy to get a firsthand look at how they’re handling the pandemic. More From This Series

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Tags: And then I moved to the hood and you’re named Daddy and you got an Irish accent.”

You can find Daddy on Twitter and Instagram at @directordaddyy. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Vulture (@vulture)

Thanks to the coronavirus, comedians are now trapped at home like the rest of us, so we decided that while we’re all self-isolating, we’d do something a little different from our usual “Follow Friday” column. He also gave some excellent advice on going by a singular name, complete with the story of why he didn’t always do so: “Daddy is literally my birth name, and I didn’t go by it for a long time because I got bullied about it — especially being the only Black kid in Ireland named Daddy. So welcome to our new version of the column, now titled “Follow (From a Safe Distance) Friday.”

This week, I sat down for an inter-coastal chitchat with one-name diva Daddy (TikTok, Supern – – – -, the Black Factory) about how he’s keeping it together this late into a global pandemic. He detailed his childhood journey from the whitest place on earth (Ireland) to the Blackest place on earth (Atlanta), rattled off an immaculately constructed elevator pitch for his newly crowdfunded upcoming film, Supern – – – -, and assured me that he is still on NYC time despite currently being in L.A.