Tag: HBO

HBO’s New Docuseries How To With John Wilson Is Nathan Fielder Approved

In addition to Fielder and Wilson, Nathan for You alums Michael Koman and Clark Reinking also serve as executive producers on How To, just in case you had any doubts that this series firmly lives within the Fielder universe. The awkward contradictions of modern life are eased by Wilson’s candid, unpolished commentary, with season one’s episodes offering up his distinct take on a range of deceivingly simple topics.” As the new teaser trailer reveals, those topics include very important things, like small talk, scaffolding, and foreskin. And foreskin. First announced in August 2019, the six-episode series is from documentary filmmaker and “self-described ‘anxious New Yorker’” John Wilson. The show debuts on HBO on Friday, October 23, at 11 p.m., so get ready to learn a lot about scaffolding. It’s what the press release describes as “a uniquely hilarious odyssey of self-discovery and cultural observation.” How To With John Wilson centers on the host as he “covertly and obsessively films the lives of his fellow New Yorkers while attempting to give everyday advice on relatable topics. Related

Nathan Fielder + the Safdie Brothers = Your New Favorite TV Show

Tags: If you’re a fan of the unapologetic celebration of social awkwardness that was Nathan Fielder’s Comedy Central series Nathan for You, you’re probably also going to be a fan of the upcoming HBO documentary series he executive-produced, How To With John Wilson.

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Adam McKay Is Developing a Coronavirus Vaccine … -Themed TV Show for HBO

The series will adapt the forthcoming narrative nonfiction book The First Shot, by journalist Brendan Borrell, which the author describes as “about the global coronavirus vaccine race, the companies that are risking all to win it, the fascinating and sometimes surprising science that it is based on, and the challenges playing out around access and safety.” Earlier this year, HBO announced that McKay would also be developing a climate-change anthology series based on New York Magazine writer David Wallace-Wells’s The Uninhabitable Earth for HBO, and a possible TV adaptation of Bong Joon Ho’s wealth-disparity parable Parasite. Related

Jennifer Lawrence Will Try to Save Humanity in Adam McKay’s Don’t Look Up

Tags: Succession executive producer Adam McKay is working on a scripted drama about “the race to develop a vaccine for COVID-19” for HBO, according to The Hollywood Reporter. McKay’s really carving out a Terrible Global Crisis niche, huh. Adam McKay
Photo: Jon Kopaloff/WireImage/Getty Images

Forget theorizing about which one of Logan Roy’s failsons will get the coveted kiss from daddy; here’s a show with capital-S stakes.

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The Elder Gods Are Ready for Their Close-ups in HBO’s Lovecraft Country Trailer

We don’t want to over-explain H.P. Vance, and childhood friend Leti, portrayed by Jurnee Smollett-Bell, to find his father, currently in the company of some exceedingly weird strangers. Lovecraft’s monster mythology, in case that would spoil too much of HBO’s upcoming Lovecraft Country, but suffice it to say, one look at the tentacled beast in the show’s new full trailer, released ahead of the series’s virtual Comic-Con panel on Saturday, will tell you our protagonists are up against something cosmically scary. Related

Jonathan Majors on Shooting Da 5 Bloods With a MAGA Hat on Set

Tags: Based on the titular book by Matt Ruff, Jonathan Majors starts in Lovecraft Country as Atticus Black, a horror and sci-fi fan who sets off across Jim Crow America with his uncle George, played by Courtney B. Any genre story worth its salt will tell you nothing good will come from trading your humanity for ultimate power. Lovecraft Country is set to premiere on HBO next month on August 16. But if that didn’t convince you, maybe those giant grotesque batwings will.

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Bridget Everett and Her Pipes Are Headed to HBO

“As a born and bred Kansan, I’m thrilled to share some of the beauty and complexity of the place that I grew up,” said Everett in a statement. The pilot was shot on location last year in Chicago and directed by Jay Duplass. SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE shows that finding your people, and finding your voice, is possible. Finding out that a mainstay of that scene has gotten their own HBO television deal. The premise for the series sounds like it could potentially border on Raise Your Voice–level hokeyness, if it weren’t for Everett’s involvement:

For all its vast plains and endless prairies, Kansas can feel confining for someone like Sam Miller. Dreams Don’t Have Deadlines.’” Everett had previously developed and starred in a trailer for Amazon Prime, called Love You More, that debuted on the streamer in 2017 and then didn’t get picked up. “Special thanks to LL Cool J for the words to live by, ‘DDHD. Somewhere. Inspired by the life of comedian and singer Bridget Everett, Sam (played by Everett) is a true Kansan on the surface, but, beneath it all, struggles to fit the hometown mold. As she grapples with loss and acceptance, singing is Sam’s saving grace and leads her on a journey to discover herself and a community of outsiders that don’t fit in but don’t give up. In a statement, HBO announced that the series will be co-produced by High Maintenance’s Hannah Bos, Chernobyl’s Carolyn Strauss, and Room 104’s Duplass brothers, making this a real Home Box Office family affair. There’s no premiere date set yet, but we’re already taking over-under odds on a Patti LuPone guest spot. Related

Watch Patti LuPone and Bridget Everett Belt ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’

Tags: Anywhere. Photo: Marion Curtis/Starpix for HBO/Shutterstock

What’s the next best thing to going to see live music, comedy, and cabaret in a cozy, communal performance space? HBO has given a series order to Somebody Somewhere, a comedy show starring and executive-produced by the eminently talented Bridget Everett.

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HBO’s Considering an In Treatment Reboot, Potentially With Zoom Therapy

“Sorry, could you unmute yourself?”
Photo: HBO

Considering the threat of COVID-19, the easiest TV shows to bring back are the ones that involve two people sitting apart from each other in a room or potentially just calling in over Zoom. Sources

TVline

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HBO’s Run Comes to a Dead Halt After One Season

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Tags: There’s not much out there about what the reboot would look like, or whether Gabriel Byrne would come back to play the therapist again, but as TVLine points out, a big advantage of an In Treatment reboot would be that it would be pretty easy to shoot while maintaining social-distance guidelines, and that “episodes could also potentially be shot remotely, with doctor/patient holding sessions via Zoom.” Wait, more importantly, is now the time to get Lisa Kudrow to bring back Web Therapy? According to TVLine, HBO is exploring plans to reboot In Treatment, which originally ran for three seasons starting in 2008 and was itself based on the Israeli series BeTipul.

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HBO’s Run Comes to a Dead Halt After One Season

The series was executive produced by Jones’s frequent collaborator, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, who also co-starred in the show as Laurel, a friendly taxidermist Ruby and Billy meet on their increasingly chaotic nationwide train ride. According to Deadline, the network has officially canceled the romantic drama starring Merritt Wever and Domhnall Gleeson as married American mother Ruby and British motivational guru Billy, college sweethearts who pull the trigger on a decade-long pact to drop everything and run away together, with predictably complicated results. Photo: HBO

Almost two months after its first season finale aired on HBO, it seems Run has hit a brick wall. “After exploring potential ways of continuing Ruby and Billy’s journey, together with showrunner Vicky Jones, we have come to the decision that we will not be moving forward with a second season of Run,” HBO said in a statement Friday. Related

Run Is a Next-Level Escapist Fantasy

Where Did Run Go Wrong? Tags:

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HBO’s Lovecraft Country Teaser Has Arrived to Take You to Eldritch Territory

Written by Misha Green and executive produced by Jordan Peele and J.J. Williams. Related

Jordan Peele, J.J. As the first teaser trailer for HBO’s Lovecraft Country reminds you, however, plenty of people have been historically willing to do the same, alien gods or no. Abrams, the least-fun road trip ever begins on HBO this coming August. Lovecraft’s horror mythology probably knows by now that the only thing scarier than interdimensional alien gods are all these mortals willing to sell out their humanity for a taste of monstrous power. Abrams Pledge HBO Show Fees to Fight Georgia Abortion Ban

The Candyman Trailer Promises Blood, Bees, and One Terrifying Urban Legend

Tags: Anyone familiar with H.P. Based on the 2016 Matt Ruff horror novel of the same name, Lovecraft Country stars Jonathan Majors as Atticus, who, aided by his friend Letitia (played by Jurnee Smollett-Bell) and his uncle George, must travel through 1950s Jim Crow America into literal Lovecraft Country, to locate his missing father, played by Michael K.

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Our Obsession With Murderers Comes for Olivia Colman in HBO’s Landscapers

Photo: Getty

From Ted Bundy to Jeffrey Dahmer to Charles Manson to every serial killer on Mindhunter, we’ve drawn from the male murderer well so often, it was only a matter of time before we let more A-list actresses benefit from our societal obsession with scripting true-crime stories. (They wanted to acquire, of all things, Hollywood memorabilia.) The Descendants director and screenwriter Alexander Payne is set to helm the show, which is being written by Ed Sinclair. Related

Gaze Upon Olivia Colman’s Single, Perfect Tear on The Crown

How The Crown’s New Actors Compare to Their Real-Life Royal Counterparts

The Crown Carries on Splendidly in Season 3

Tags: According to Variety, Olivia Colman will portray Susan Edwards, one half of a British married couple who killed Susan’s parents, Patricia and William Wycherley, in 1998, and then successfully hid their bodies for over a decade in their garden. The Edwards reportedly wrote holiday cards and signed documents following their crime to create the illusion that the Wycherleys were still alive and so that they might financially benefit. It will air as the four-part limited series Landscapers from HBO and Sky.

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HBO’s Confederate Delay Allegedly Not Due to Controversy, But Rather Extreme Busyness

“It’s hard to say to someone, ‘You can’t go do Star Wars.’ They love it. Weiss. “When they come out of that, I assume they will come back to us.”

After the network announced Confederate, which imagines a modern-day reality in which the South successfully seceded and slavery was never abolished, many people used the hashtag #NoConfederate during summer 2017 to ask the network not to make the show. The pair have been swamped, you see, with all the Game of Thrones showrunning and writing several upcoming Star Wars films they have going on. “Dan and David are finishing up the final season [of Game of Thrones] and then they are going to go into the Star Wars universe,” Bloys said. They’ll go do that, remember why they love television and come back.”

Sources

TVLine

Related

HBO Issues Statement Addressing #NoConfederate Twitter Protest

Amazon Is Developing Its Own Alternate-History Series Called Black America

Tags: Afterward, Bloys admitted that HBO could have “done a better job with the press rollout,” but the network nonetheless hoped “that people will reserve judgment until there is something to see.”

As it stands today, the future of the show is apparently in the hands of Benioff and Weiss, whose hands are, as we mentioned, extremely full of Star Wars movies. “The delay has to do with [the fact] that they were offered three movies,” Bloys explained to TVLine. It’s a childhood dream. Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images for BAFTA LA

While it might seem like the controversy around HBO’s upcoming alternate history drama Confederate would be the natural explanation for why the show hasn’t seen much movement in the past two years, HBO chief Casey Bloys told TVLine on Friday that it’s actually a scheduling issue related to the series’s creators, David Benioff and D.B. D.B. Weiss and David Benioff.

Bill Maher’s Own Audience Boos Him for Giving Ann Coulter Airtime

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Bill Maher Is Stand-up Comedy’s Past. That’s because when he announced during Friday’s show that he booked Coulter for an interview next week, the audience descended into a chorus of boos, bona fide spooky sounds that Maher couldn’t have cared less about. Bill Maher. Photo: John Shearer/Getty Images

Your crazy aunt Ann Coulter is back in the news again, which might be great for one particular SNL cast member, but for the rest of us, it means the inevitable talk-show appearances that’ll let her spew her nonsense about the government shutdown a little longer. Hannah Gadsby Represents Its Future. A policy maker,” he retorted. (A true Tracy Jordan power move!) “Yeah, that’s called a newsmaker. The first of the late-night power players to take the bait is none other than Coulter’s longtime pal, Bill Maher, on his HBO program Real Time, news that Maher’s faithful legion of followers didn’t like at all. “You’ll have to suck on that.” That, or they can just boo again in six days.

If You Can’t Get Enough of Elena Ferrante, Read This.

Photo: Photo Illustration by Stevie Remsberg; Photos: Getty Images, HBO, Amazon

Ferrante Fever was an epidemic circa 2014-2016, and the new HBO adaptation of My Brilliant Friend is the perfect excuse to revisit everything we loved about the Neapolitan novels. The Cut on Tuesdays
A weekly podcast from the Cut and Gimlet Media, with host Molly Fischer. We asked everyone to suggest further reading — books that might scratch the same itch as the Neapolitan novels, or deepen your understanding of Ferrante’s work. Calling it a “friendship” almost feels simplistic. The crux of the story is the way these two women have been inside each other’s heads for their entire conscious lives. Plus, you’ll hear from writers, editors, and fellow Ferrante fans like Samhita Chakraborty, Aminatou Sow, and Ruth Spencer. Subscribe on:

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Tags: This week’s show explores the world of Elena Ferrante: We talked to Ann Goldstein, the translator who’s become a stand-in for the pseudonymous author; Danielle Oteri, who leads tours of Lila and Lenu’s Naples; and Dayna Tortorici, whose essay “Those Like Us” is essential for anyone interested in learning more about Ferrante’s ideas. The Cut on Tuesdays: a weekly podcast from the Cut and Gimlet Media, with host Molly Fischer. Some of their recommendations are below. (And, as always, click at the bottom of the page to listen and subscribe!)

Frantumaglia, by Elena Ferrante

$12

at Amazon

$12

at Amazon

Buy

$12

at Amazon

Buy

The Days of Abandonment, by Elena Ferrante

$10

at Amazon

$10

at Amazon

Buy

$10

at Amazon

Buy

History: A Novel, by Elsa Morante

$24

at Amazon

$24

at Amazon

Buy

$24

at Amazon

Buy

Sula, by Toni Morrison

$10

at Amazon

$10

at Amazon

Buy

$10

at Amazon

Buy

Neapolitan Chronicles, by Anna Maria Ortese

$12

at Amazon

$12

at Amazon

Buy

$12

at Amazon

Buy

Conversations With Friends, by Sally Rooney

$12

at Amazon

$12

at Amazon

Buy

$12

at Amazon

Buy

The God of Small Things, by Arundhati Roy

$13

at Amazon

$13

at Amazon

Buy

$13

at Amazon

Buy

A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, by Betty Smith

$13

at Amazon

$13

at Amazon

Buy

$13

at Amazon

Buy

The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan

$14

at Amazon

$14

at Amazon

Buy

$14

at Amazon

Buy

If you buy something through our links, New York may earn an affiliate commission. The four books span decades in the lives of two Italian women: From their childhood in 1950s Naples, to their involvement in the political radicalism of the ’60s and ’70s, up until 2010 … which is when one of the women, who has become a successful writer, learns that the other — who still lives in the neighborhood where they grew up — has disappeared.

HBO Renews Divorce for a Third Season, Because These Things Take Time

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You Owe It to Yourself to Watch Divorce Season Two

Sarah Jessica Parker Says Sex And The City’s Lack of Diversity Seems ‘Tone-Deaf’

Tags: Interestingly, Divorce’s third season order is only six episodes, so prepare yourself: You might have to move on before too long. Photo: CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP/Getty Images

There’s nothing harder than letting go, and now luckily you won’t have to! HBO announced Friday that Sarah Jessica Parker’s comedy Divorce will get a third season, and it will start production in early 2019. Sex And The City alum Liz Tuccillo, who wrote on the show’s second season, will serve as showrunner and executive producer.

Martin Scorsese Still Can’t Get Over Vinyl’s ‘Tragic’ Failure

Cruel.) Scorsese lent his directorial chops with the pilot and slowly receded the scope of his power in the subsequent episodes, a decision he now believes set the show up for failure. It was something that I realized, in order to make it right … I think I would have had to direct every episode and be there for the three to four years.” Scorsese points to Paolo Sorrentino’s stunning The Young Pope as the perfect example of a film director adapting to the landscape of television, primarily because Sorrentino also assumed the role of showrunner. Related

Bobby Cannavale Is Sad About Vinyl Cancellation

Tags: “We tried for one year with HBO, but we couldn’t get the creative elements together. “It was ultimately tragic for me because we tried for one year,” Scorsese explained at the Rome Film Festival, per THR. Photo: HBO

In a rare misstep for Martin Scorsese, that Italian septuagenarian dreamboat signed on to executive produce HBO’s Vinyl, a 1970s music-and-cocaine romp that got the ax after one season. “You do everything. You do it all … if you don’t [want to make that commitment], you shouldn’t be making the series.” Or, rather, cast a very hot papal figure. “If you do it, you do it right like Sorrentino does,” Scorsese explained. (Despite, actually, originally securing a season two renewal.

Every HBO Sex Scene Will Now Have Required ‘Intimacy’ Supervision

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HBO Refused to Air This One ‘Horrifying’ Sex and the City Scene

Tags: “Even I didn’t understand the scope of just how much this had been ignored, and for how long,” Rodis told Rolling Stone about the need for this type of job. “There is such a power dynamic on sets, so much pressure and this sense that as an actor you just suck it up and do it.” You listening, Showtime? As first reported in Rolling Stone, HBO is requiring every “intimate” scene — be it foreplay, oral, or just the good ole’ fashioned bangin’ — in their programming slate to be “staffed by an intimacy coordinator,” effective immediately. This comes after the second season of The Deuce, about the porn industry in 1970s New York City, became the first series on the network to implement such a practice with Alicia Rodis, who has since gone on to be the intimacy coordinator for Crashing and the forthcoming Deadwood movie. Photo: HBO

HBO has enjoyed a long and exciting history as a network filled with the freakiest sex stuff, and now, they’re making it safer for actors who have to engage in that aforementioned freaky sex.

What Else Is Left to Say About Elvis?

But best in show goes to Priscilla Presley, who leverages her intimate relationship with Elvis to connect the sound of his music and the arc of his life. She talks about how his brilliant 1968 special was about reminding people of why Elvis was a big deal even as the instrumentation positioned him as a contemporary artist again: “It was about bringing him back to the beginning while going into the future.” She talks about his affinity for opera singers, and how that drove his vocal performance on his classic “It’s Now or Never,” and makes the killer observation that his late-’60s work was about blending gospel and blues and overlaying it all with his Elvisness, and in the process, finally achieving his fullest expression. Most of Elvis’s distress is blamed on the death of his mother and the dominance of Colonel Tom Parker, his longtime manager and a dark father figure — a conventional view of what drove the singer. The editing seamlessly interweaves archival footage, re-creations with actors (their faces obscured), and informative close-ups of sheet music, album covers, contracts, and the like. Nevertheless, The Searcher protests too much, in a way that makes it seem as if there’s fire with the smoke. It screams “This is cinematic!” while mangling the integrity of the older images, which comprise much of the film’s running time and were shot in the more squarish, 4:3 format characteristic of old newsreels and early TV. The best that cultural critics and storytellers can do now is find a mildly fresh angle on the totality of Elvis, or zero in on a specific moment in his life or career. If you’re mainly interested in seeing Elvis’s psychology, personal biography, and feelings explored in detail, this documentary won’t do much for you. Mostly, it’s lose some, as reverently as it considers the meaning of Elvis. Filmmaker Thom Zimny, the director of numerous music documentaries and a regular editor on HBO’s The Wire, goes with option one, crafting a lengthy and meticulous, childhood-to-grave account of Elvis’s brief time on Earth. Why vandalize the past in this way? Bruce Springsteen’s longtime producer Jon Landau, the late Tom Petty, and other notable music-industry figures have smart things to say about Elvis’s relationship to gospel and country traditions and his relationship to black music, although a good bit of it feels like unnecessary damage control. Mythically powerful signposts and totems, such as the impact of Elvis’s twin brother dying at birth, get glossed over. There’s a sense in which this film — like a lot of recent documentaries about famous musicians — exist as brand extensions and ads first, no matter how much sensitivity and intelligence they bring to their subjects. Unsavory and depressing aspects of the King’s later years, such as his drug addiction and paranoia, his increasingly erratic and even violent behavior, and his symbiotic relationship with hangers-on, are barely addressed. Aesthetically, The Searcher is a win-some, lose-some situation. Still, The Searcher excels when it analyzes the evolution of Elvis’s music and image, treating him (perhaps not coincidentally) as a human brand who was created before the word “brand” was a thing. The two-part HBO documentary Elvis Presley: The Searcher doesn’t have many new thing to say about its subject, but 40-plus years and countless books, magazine articles, documentaries, and feature films after his death, I’m not sure what, factually, could have been added. A lot of the time, we are literally seeing about 60 percent of what was there originally, often masked so that shots of groups of people can only show one person’s head while slicing off everyone else’s at the forehead or upper lip. Despite the famous Public Enemy lyric insisting that Elvis was “straight-up racist,” there’s no evidence of that being true. Tags: But the superficiality of the film’s biography makes it feel rushed, even when it’s making a point of lingering (as in the sections on Elvis entering the Army and Elvis becoming a sequined creature of Vegas). Standard opinions are trotted out again, like the belief that Elvis’s movie output was mostly pointless, except for a couple of the early ones — a statement that people who obsess over how he moved, and how Hollywood struggled to reconcile its need for safety with Elvis’s sexual dangerousness, would dispute. The closest comparison is probably Martin Scorsese’s Bob Dylan biography No Direction Home, which was as much a critical-scholarly study of Dylan’s music as it was an account of his life. The documentary’s executive producers include Elvis’s wife, Priscilla; key “Memphis Mafia” member Jerry Schilling, who was friends with Elvis from 1954 until his death; Andrew Solt, who produced many documentaries about Elvis (and who must have either supplied or assisted with excerpts included here); and Jamie Salter, chairman and CEO of Authentic Brands Group, which manages Presley’s estate. I wouldn’t have minded a much shorter documentary focused only on that. Bruce Springsteen, of all people, makes a case for Elvis just wanting to share great music with the world when he was really just melding traditions he was familiar with and enjoyed, in an instinctive way that was surely more about self-expression than altruism or education. When the subject is the specific sound of Elvis’s music — the component parts and how they ultimately combine and fuse — The Searcher is an absolute banger. Written biographies of Elvis — such as Peter Guralnick’s two-parter, Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love, from which The Searcher cribs its structure — have a lot more freedom to dig and speculate, because they don’t have to watch what they say for fear of being barred from being able to show his image or play his music. Everybody who wades into this part of the pool has sharp observations to offer, Petty and Robertson in particular. The director’s decision to crop the entire thing to narrow CinemaScope dimensions is a mistake that will annoy anyone who cares about composition and/or is familiar with how media from Elvis’s time actually looked. What difference does it make if the black bars are at the top and bottom of the frame as opposed to the sides? Elvis Presley: The Searcher premieres Saturday, April 14 on HBO. When we’re looking at Elvis in a supertight close-up, bobbing and dancing, the cropping is a flat-out disaster: The King becomes a sweaty nose moving in and out of the frame. I’d imagine this is all the result of conscious exclusion or unconscious censorship. If she had a podcast that did nothing but play Elvis’s music and then talk about how it sounded, I’d subscribe. The decision to restrict expert witnesses to audio-only allows living and dead witnesses (including Sun Records founder Sam Phillips, and Elvis himself) to coexist in a perpetual present of scholarship and appreciation.

Jane the Virgin Recap: A Visit From the Tooth Fairy

If this show wants to hurt you, it won’t mess around and then undo everything and say “gotcha!” It will hurt you, and it will do so deliberately, carefully, and very thoroughly. One second you’re dodging tooth fairy mythology and the next, you’re walloped with some offhand comment about mortality and you’re stuck there with your mouth hanging open, nearly weeping. To be continued! Jane loves a surprise, but it’s almost always more interested in the aftermath, and twists that truly come out of left field are more likely to alienate an audience anyway. Which you’d assume would look weird, but it looks so, so much weirder than I’d ever have thought? There’s no way the show would’ve introduced the potential for a cancer story as just a tease. Let’s see, anything else to say? The recent run of episodes have been fantastic, and yet, I’ve been holding out on handing out a five-star ranking for a while. It was Krishna! It is so fascinating and impressive to see how far these characters have all come since their original instantiations at the beginning of this show. This is exactly how it happens with kids, of course. My heart. I am really hoping Raf makes the right choice on this one, but it’s an interesting place to put him. When Xiomara does finally tell them at the end of the episode, and they all get down on their knees in prayer? You want a smaller bosom? She tried to get Petra put away for murder! “In other words,” he tells us, “it’s our origin story, told by a side character.”

#Rogelio

All of Rogelio’s responses to River’s Brenda criticisms are gold. The moment I knew for sure that Xiomara would have cancer, and that this plot would stick around for a while, was not when she finally announced it near the end of the episode. Rogelio leaves because he’s so upset. She planted the screws! Oh right! There was never any question that she was withholding the truth to protect Rogelio’s important work meeting, and there was never any doubt that she’d have to tell everyone the truth soon. Our Narrator turns it into a little motif on the theme of side characters and changing perspectives, and from the broader view of this series, it’s nice to get some interiority to Luisa that goes beyond “she is off her rocker most of the time.”

What’s more, when Rafael does finally track Luisa down, we find her happy, sober, and self-possessed. DONE.”

That poster for Feud: Rogelio vs. From the looks of “Chapter Seventy-Seven,” we should all get ready. Ugh. I knew immediately what was coming, and that’s a good thing. And she just jumped out a window while also reminding Petra about her dry-cleaning! Petra’s meek and mild-mannered assistant Krishna, the long-suffering target of Petra’s workplace abuse and her constant, quiet shadow for a long time now, is actually the blackmailer! I would never have imagined Rogelio weeping at Xiomara’s diagnosis, or Rafael not exploding at the information that all his money has gone. River! Rogelio and Our Narrator are understandably nonplussed. Immediately, we can see that Rogelio has no idea who the Brenda character actually is, and I love the idea of Fields as a difficult but valuable creative partner. (Because of how television episodes work, I am hesitant to say that this retroactively makes all of Jane a frame narrative and Our Narrator a frame narrator, but it’s open for debate.) In going through Luisa’s records to find information about his birth parents, Rafael stumbles on the deposition that Luisa gave immediately after accidentally inseminating Jane, and Luisa’s voice becomes a storyteller in this episode. As I’d suspected, Xiomara has breast cancer, and Jane seems prepped to get deep into a story about her diagnosis, treatment, and how this will affect the Villanuevas. I want it for my bedroom wall. I am overcome with love for her, and if JR doesn’t shape up and realize what a gift she has in Petra’s affections, I will be very displeased. “I will happily adjust the character. There’s so much great stuff packed into this little subplot, including every single shot of Brooke Shields with no eyebrows because Rogelio burned them off with an over-enthusiastic Bananas Foster. Will he still fill that role now that he’s in a serious relationship with Jane? I say this not in a negative way, at all: The real situation was immediately obvious. Jaime Camil played it absolutely right, and it’s such a notable shift from our usual Rogelio antics. The first time it hits is early in the episode, as Petra’s twins cheerfully destroy Mateo’s entire worldview by telling him that the tooth fairy isn’t real. She felt so bad that her daughters ruined Mateo’s tooth fairy mythology, she somehow found a wildly over-the-top fairy costume (featuring pointy ears and lace mask!), snuck into Jane’s house, and threw on a weird British-y accent in order to spot Mateo a $20 bill for his first lost tooth. Instantly, it’s apparent not just that the show will take this very seriously, but also that its characters and cast have enough depth and talent to completely crush it. “And,” he says, “in other terrible, horrible, no good very bad news …”

When Petra gets a text from JR: “Ooh, a text from one of her very favorite side characters … or should I say … side piece.”

When Jane finds Luisa’s deposition, Our Narrator helps with some hand-holding. Much of the episode is spent waiting for word about the biopsy results, and when Xiomara finally receives the call, she tells Rogelio and Jane that the results were clear and she’s actually fine. I could never have predicted that one of my favorite scenes would be Petra sneaking into Mateo’s bedroom dressed as the tooth fairy. Speaking of Jane the Virgin’s continuing ultra-meta-narrative preoccupations, I am delighted to note that this episode actually is a frame narrative! From Our Narrator, With Love

It’s nice to see Our Narrator has been brushing up on children’s books lately. Mateo is still focused on the tooth fairy, but with the cloud of Xiomara’s biopsy hanging in the room, all the adults grow still, because they’re suddenly thinking about Xiomara’s biopsy. He’s been the good-to-bad-to-good-again swing character for so long. Of course, Rafael then has to make a choice between protecting her or selling her out to Rose so he can get more information about his family. “How will I make a distinction when they hit one that’s really great?” I thought to myself. How far can the show press our newfound trust in him? Petra has been parenting them with “radical honesty,” which, to be fair, does seem to include an honest account of exactly how privileged they are. It’s funny to describe a twist as predictable, or inevitable, or transparent, and to mean that as a compliment. She seems surprisingly willing to go along with the project, but then we realize she’s just doing it so she can land a role on HBO’s Confederate. She’s gotten rid of all of Solano Marbella money — it’s locked in a trust benefiting embattled ferrets or something — and she is finally free of Rose. WELL. “Chapter Seventy-Seven” gives us the aftermath of Xiomara’s biopsy, Petra dressing up as the tooth fairy, the long-awaited reveal that Krishna isn’t just a mild-mannered assistant, Petra stanning for JR, Narrator joking about side characters, an actual frame narrative (!), a very happy Luisa, some dunking on HBO’s Confederate, and Brooke Shields with no eyebrows! It was here, when Rogelio sat on the bed and his whole body was nearly shaking, and he told Jane that he was just so, so scared. Photo: Greg Gayne/The CW

Jane the Virgin

Chapter Seventy-Seven
Season 4

Episode 13

Editor’s Rating

5 stars

Complete Series Coverage

I’ve been dithering on the episode-by-episode rankings for the past several episodes. She’s calm. Tags: Fields’s efforts to get the role of “Racist Lady #6” on Confederate are amazing, but it’s also just fascinating to watch a TV show where a female character marks up a script to improve an underwritten female character. (They don’t care about tooth fairy money, because “we’re very fortunate.”) But they use their knowledge to crush Mateo’s tooth fairy enthusiasm, and also, oh by the way, everybody dies. This show is a gift. In the midst of all that, we also get Rogelio’s efforts to convince River to join his Santos project.

Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas Trailer Promises To At Least Try to Come Up With Some Solutions

Which is to say, ants probably aren’t the worst of it. Problem Areas premieres Friday, April 13. In the docuseries-style show, Cenac will reportedly travel “from suburban Minneapolis to downtown Cincinnati to rural Texas” to learn about, and comment on, America’s woes. Related
HBO Is Releasing a Wyatt Cenac Docu-Series on ‘Hot-Button Issues’ This Spring

Tags: In the new trailer for his upcoming HBO series Problem Areas, former Daily Show correspondent Wyatt Cenac demonstrates the exact attitude you’ll need to tackle the many, many problems facing the world today: contemplative and relaxed, despite being completely covered in ants.

2 Dope Queens Is a Terrific Newcomer to Late-Night TV

Anyone who listens to podcasts — or, for that matter, anyone who used to watch old ’70s variety shows like Sonny and Cher — knows there’s something special about watching a program co-hosted by two people who really know how to catch each other’s passes. Yet most late-night shows are solo acts with the occasional sidekick or bandleader who acts as a sounding board for jokes. “This is a safe space!” Williams adds. Related
How 2 Dope Queens’ Phoebe Robinson Turned a Podcast Into an HBO Special

Tags: Williams and Robinson have clearly planned out some elements of their discussions: When Jon Stewart appears in the first episode, for example, they ask him to play a game that involves blind taste-testing pizza, which must have been orchestrated ahead of time. But there’s an improvisational air to the proceedings that suggests everyone is more comfortable just going with the flow. (I still don’t know where she got them.)

Essentially, 2 Dope Queens is a late-night show doing valuable things that the major network late-night shows do not. I’ve seen the first two episodes of 2 Dope Queens, and of the two, the second is stronger. The late-night talk format could use some shaking up, and the best way to shake it up on a more regular basis might be to send in the Queens. Their observational comedy is incisive, but never mean. Stand-up comedians pop in to do short sets, and high-profile guests show up to chat with the Queens. Photo: HBO

If you like 2 Dope Queens the podcast, you’ll like 2 Dope Queens the HBO series. (“Here’s one,” Williams offers. “Everyone shut your mouths!” Robinson shouts at the audience, hearing light laughter. That’s partly because the comedians who appear in that hour — Aparna Nancherla, a regular on HBO’s Crashing who also provides the voice of Hollyhock on BoJack Horseman; Rhea Butcher, co-creator of the late Seeso comedy Take My Wife; and Fresh Off the Boat writer Sheng Wang — are consistently great. But now, all of it is happening at Kings Theatre on a stage that has been stylishly designed to resemble a Brooklyn rooftop, albeit one that features “2 Dope Queens” spelled out in large, illuminated numbers and letters. First and foremost, it puts two black women in an authoritative role as emcees and tastemakers, which is most welcome. How you can have really incredible …” Parker starts, trying to formulate a question. “The white guy at the bar who says, ‘I love chocolate.’”) Much like they are on their podcast, Williams and Robinson keep it real but inclusive. Here’s another reason why: There are two of them. “I don’t know, um, how it stays. Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson. But the Queens and their guest, Sarah Jessica Parker, also stay more laser-focused on the identified theme of the episode: “Hair.”

When Robinson and Williams invite Parker to ask any questions she may have about black hair, it starts a conversation about how African-American women manage their dos, one in which the Queens freeze out any attempts to giggle at the Divorce star for her lack of knowledge in this area. “Oh, yes!” Robinson cheers. The HBO series is essentially the same as the WNYC podcast that came before it, just a little fancier and, obviously, more visual. “You know that I’m about to ask the very thing that you don’t know either,” Parker says wryly to the audience. “Drag them, Sarah!”

To be clear, white cluelessness is still a ripe subject for eye rolls in 2 Dope Queens. The first episode kicks off with the ladies running down a list of the various white people who should apologize to them on live television. In the middle of the first episode, I actually paused my screener to look up the shoes Williams was wearing. We rarely see hosting partnerships that are true partnerships. Like most things on television, it’s possible to watch the four-part comedy special anytime you like. Surely it helps, too, that the episodes are directed by Tig Notaro, who obviously has a feel for capturing the spontaneity of live comedy. You want to unwind with 2 Dope Queens over a drink, but maybe only one, because you want to keep your mental faculties sharp. But there’s something that feels especially right about watching it, as HBO intended, at 11:30 p.m. While hosts Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson, along with the talent that joins them, are essentially here to perform, they do so in a way that feels like they’re engaging in a loose, late-night conversation with their audience. Williams and Robinson, who always look chic, also look extra put together for premium cable. Second, its conversations have a much more organic vibe than the sit-down interviews on the Tonight Show or Late Show. on a Friday night. Although there are only four episodes of 2 Dope Queens, the ones I’ve seen make a convincing case that we need to see Williams and Robinson in late night on a more regular basis. Williams and Robinson engage in casual verbal volleys on topics ranging from their first New York City apartments to bad dreadlocks.

Jemaine Clement Says Flight of the Conchords Are Returning with Hour-Long Special

Some of it we’ll be working on in the next few months.”

However, business time is not yet finished. At the Television Critics Association on Friday, IndieWire asked Jemaine Clement, one half of the New Zealand duo, about the possibility. Photo: Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

The pretty prince of parties The Flight of the Conchords might be migrating back to television sometime this year. Clement, who was at TCA to promote the FX series Legion, reportedly confirmed that he and bandmate Bret McKenzie would be back for an hour-long special on HBO. television adaption of the vampire mockumentary he co-wrote with Taika Waititi, What We Do In the Shadows. A rep for HBO told AV Club, “The deals are not fully in place. We’ll hopefully have news soon and will be back in touch.”

Clement also confirmed that he is working on the U.S. Clement said they would be filming a pilot later this year. “We’ve done some of it before, some of it will be new. “It should be fun,” Clement said. Sources

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Game of Thrones Won’t Return Until 2019, Sophie Turner Says

“Game of Thrones comes back in 2019,” the actress says. Photo: HBO

The dream of spring remains a long way off. In a new interview with Variety, Sophie Turner confirms that the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones won’t hit screens for more than a year. Tags: Part of the delay seems to be due to sheer bulk; though the final season will only be six episodes long, each could reportedly be in the 80-minute range. Think of all the CGI they’ll need just for the ice dragon! Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams in Game of Thrones. Still, if there’s one thing you can say, it’s that this fan base has plenty of experience with long waits. HBO had previously kept mum about when the season, which began filming in October, would go to air.

2017, the Year Movies and TV Came On Your Screen

What follows is one of the most heart-wrenching scenes of the year: Nathan — HIV negative, strapping, and healthy — cradles Sean in his arms and gives him the only succor he can. Cum for everybody!”

In sum, 2017’s cum shots weren’t needlessly provocative (although that would be fine, too), but instead added texture, flavor, humor, and intimacy to the narratives they appeared in. Elio tells Oliver that the maid looks for “signs,” but Oliver tells him not to worry. “When we met with HBO, we mentioned a cum-shot scene and they said, ‘You’re just in time!’” Rae told me at Vulture Festival L.A. But 2017 has offered the most tasteful, nuanced portrayals of cum yet — and in the sorts of award-winning projects you wouldn’t have expected to see semen in the past. But at last, in 2017, our screens have runneth over with the fountain of youth: cum, the sticky coital leftover conveniently and historically ignored in sex scenes, is making a splashy debut. Meanwhile, over on television, Insecure won the distinction for the most memorable cum shot of the year — a full-on turkey baster to the face. Elio then bursts into tears, ostensibly moved by the idea that someone would want to feel that connected with him. Sean, who’s HIV positive, is depressed and dying, his body a thin carriage of skin and bones. Photo-Illustration: Vulture

With each passing year, television and film edge closer to portraying the reality of sex, whether it’s through the female gaze, hand jobs, or the strap-on. “All those details, for me, are not provocative. “We couldn’t do that with Girls but now we can! I show it because it connects me so much to the actors and the characters. Related Stories

The 10 Best Movies of 2017

There’s one scene from BPM that stands out for its poignancy: Nathan gives Sean a hand job after the latter has been hospitalized. And just a few years ago, Girls showed Adam’s (Adam Driver) sperm all over Natalia’s chest (Shiri Appleby) in the season-two episode “On All Fours.” (All in all, HBO has really been the go-to network to let male ejaculate fly.)

Film has certainly taken bolder strokes, but cum often showed up in movies that rode the line between pornography and art. But before we dive in, we’d be remiss not to point out cum’s prior appearances. It’s possible that cum’s foray onto our screens indicates that, as a culture, we’re at last becoming a little more adult about all of this stuff (or, at least, the Europeans are). It wasn’t shy or shrinking, but alternately prosaic and messy. Think of the opening of John Cameron Mitchell’s Shortbus, when Paul Dawson sucks himself off and comes into his mouth, or Michael Winterbottom’s 9 Songs, which featured actual sex between the two romantic leads Kieran O’Brien and Margo Stilley, and more recently of course, the ever-provocative Gaspar Noé giving audiences a 3-D cum facial with his film Love. They struggle to the point where the poor condom is stretched nearly to its breaking point. This cum had the range. It’s a simple detail, but one that adds warmth to the scene. They are really normal,” said Robin Campillo, the director of the film. On the short-lived Tell Me You Love Me, Adam Scott wore a prosthetic penis that eventually choked out some hair conditioner. It’s a climactic moment in their relationship that culminates in a major blowup between them (and has Issa dabbing her eye for the rest of the day). He leaves the bruised peach, oozing with sperm, on his desk and falls asleep, whereupon his lover Oliver (Armie Hammer) discovers it and dips his finger inside for a taste (but does not eat it). “I don’t show it to shock. — he cums in her eye. After Sean cums on his stomach, Nathan wipes it off with tissues, and they laugh, because cum, in all its messiness, is a reminder of life. Even though the scene is played for its comedy, it also brings up Issa’s own anxieties about the power dynamic when black women give men head (she thinks it makes the woman seem demeaned and disposable). But there’s a less audacious — and equally tender — moment before that. Cum is hitting the mainstream, baby! Perhaps we’re finally ready to acknowledge a truth we’ve known since time immemorial: There will be cum. He misses Nathan, and the two have grown distant as Sean grows ill. This year, the baby-making fluid came at us fast and loose, onto screens big and small, into romances both gay and straight, stories both dramatic and comedic. Boy, what a difference a year has made: It was not so long ago that HBO reportedly got soft about showing an arcing cum shot on Girls, making Insecure’s arrival right on the money. On the TV front, you’ll recall the episode of Sex and the City, where Carrie Bradshaw and the rest of the women attend a tantric sex workshop and Miranda gets caught in the crossfire of some male ejaculate that looked like Elmer’s glue. She wants to throw it out, but he’s paranoid she might try to impregnate herself with the contents, so he refuses to give it to her. Surprise! And then there’s straight-up joke cum. One of the most seminal movie moments of the year involves a cum-filled peach in Call Me by Your Name: A horny teenage Elio (Timothée Chalamet) masturbates with the stone fruit and ejaculates inside of it. What’s particularly salient about this year, though, is placement: Cum appeared in respectable, prestige film and TV projects like Insecure and Call Me by Your Name. To feel the reality of all those things, you know?” With BPM, the mechanics of gay sex aren’t treated with trepidation or taboo, but rather with an understanding that it’s part of life. After the pair have sex for the first time, Oliver wipes off some cum with his blue button-down — affectionately called “Billowy” in André Aciman’s novel. Tags: BPM, the Grand Prix winner this year at Cannes that’s also France’s submission for best foreign film at the Oscars, takes a similarly realistic approach. Finally, he throws it out, only for her to run off with the trash can. In the episode “Hella Blows,” Issa Rae’s character, Issa, gives her sometimes-lover Daniel (Y’lan Noel) a blow job when — despite requisite verbal warning! Cum exists alongside lube, condoms, and discussions of HIV status as part of the fabric of how gay men have sex. In the Palme d’Or winning The Square, Anne (Elisabeth Moss) and Christian (Claes Bang) fight over a cum-filled condom after they have sex. (We saw the aftermath). The sex scenes between the two lovers Nathan (Arnaud Valois) and Sean (Nahuel Pérez-Biscayart) are frank and filled with naturalism.

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Watch Estelle and Tarrus Riley New Video “Love Like Ours”

Tarrus Riley stayed true to the all-white theme while delivering his vocals. Estelle and Tarrus Riley serve up a feel-good video for their groovy new single “Love Like Ours” watch it below. “Love Like Ours” is the first single off Estelle’s upcoming album, due in the spring of next year. Estelle is currently working on her next album which will be the follow-up to her 2015 LP True Romance. “She’s smilin’ all because of I, yeah / Yes truly, keeps us smiling, hey / You know you had your times to love up / Its not my fault / They said love is a gamble when you love,” the reggae crooner sings. The British songstress is hitting the studio all while focusing on her acting career with recurring roles on Empire and Issa Rae’s HBO show Insecure. The Denzel Williams-directed video features the Grammy-winning singer clad in full white with some rasta themed jewelry while delivering the soulful lyrics in front a lush green natural backdrop.

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